The Corn is Green by Emlyn Williams

bookshelves: period-piece, britain-wales, published-1941, play-dramatisation, summer-2014, amusing

Recommended to ☯Bettie☯ by: Laura
Read on August 11, 2014

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04d0kl1

Description: Miss Moffat, an English spinster, settles in a Welsh mining village where she starts a school for the boys of the neighborhood. Morgan Evans shows promise and Miss Moffat determines to do everything possible for him. Against the prejudice of local folk and the wealthy squire, she manages to make good, and in Morgan she finds a young man who will go far. She at last persuades the squire to lend his support, and she prepares the boy to apply for a scholarship to Oxford. Morgan, however, rebels against help from a woman and temporarily succumbs to the charm of a flashy girl. His mistaken sense of obligation nearly ruins his chances of success, and Miss Moffat realizes that her interest in him has become too absorbing. However, her affection for him, her courage and wisdom in the end bring her victory; Morgan wins the scholarship, and Miss Moffat’s work comes to a happy conclusion.

BBC Blurberoonies: Scene: Glansarno, a small village in a remote Welsh countryside. Teacher Miss Moffat is determined to win local miners over to her English ways in this semi-autobiographical work by Emlyn Williams. Time: a period of three years in the latter part of the 19th century.

Tongue in cheek fun at expense of the Chapel, Child Labour, Zenophobia, Misogeny, Blue-stocking Idealism and Willing Repression. Wonderful fun

Best line: ‘Leave those flowers to die a natural death in their beds’

Miss Moffat: Gladys Young.
Morgan Evans: Richard Burton.
Welsh folk songs sung by boys from Aberdare County School.
Adapted for broadcasting by T Rowland Hughes. Produced by PH Burton.
First broadcast on Saturday Night Theatre – BBC Home Service 27th January 1945

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