All Things Wise and Wonderful

 

 

Had my doubts when picking this up such along time after reading the others however I loved it; gentleness coupled with reserved mode of story-telling had me in its grips right from the get-go. The inclusion of RAF training and the birth of his son in this volume were absolutely lovely.

4* – All Creatures Great and Small (1972)
4* – All Things Bright and Beautiful (1973)

4* – All Things Wise and Wonderful (1977)
4* – The Lord God Made Them All (1981)
4* – James Herriot’s Dog Stories (1986)
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The Friend of the Family by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04fxy8d

BBC description: 4 Extra Debut. Russia, 1859. Chaos in the manor of Stephanchikovo when an ex-sergeant acts as arbiter of morals and taste. Stars David Suchet.

Drink a bottle of vodka and you can talk in any language you like!

Clive Merison and Davis Suchet excel in this written-as-a-play short story.

A Wild Sheep Chase by Haruki Murakami

bookshelves: handbag-read, paper-read, winter-20122013, tbr-busting-2013, published-1982, amusing, doo-lally, japan, magical-realism

Read from May 17, 2012 to February 28, 2013

 

Translated from the Japanese by Alfred Birnbaum

Opening: It was a short one-paragraph item in the morning edition. A friend rang me up to read it to me. Nothing special. Something a rookie reporter fresh out of college might’ve written for practice.

Ginko leaves strewn across the ground.

#60 TBR Busting 2013

Also have the audio file:

This is Murakami’s version of a Moby Dick story, and fun it was too.

5* The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
4* Kafka on the Shore
2* Norwegian Wood
3* A Wild Sheep Chase
4* After Dark
2* 1Q84 (will re-read at some point)
TR Dance Dance Dance
TR The Elephant Vanishes
4* After the Quake
3* Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman

The Vesuvius Club (Lucifer Box,#1) by Mark Gatiss

 

Description: Following a dinnertime assassination, Lucifer is dispatched to uncover the whereabouts of missing agent Jocelyn Poop. Along the way he will give art lessons, be attacked by a poisonous centipede, bed a few choice specimens, and travel to Italy on business and pleasure. Aided by his henchwoman Delilah; the beautiful, mysterious, and Dutch Miss Bella Pok; his boss, a dwarf who takes meetings in a lavatory; grizzled vulcanologist Emmanuel Quibble; and the impertinent, delicious, right-hand-boy Charlie Jackpot, Lucifer Box deduces and seduces his way from his elegant townhouse at Number 9 Downing Street (somebody has to live there) to the ruined city of Pompeii, to infiltrate a highly dangerous secret society that may hold the fate of the world in its clawlike grip

Opening words:
I have always been an appalling judge of character. It is my most beguiling virtue. What, then, did I make of the Honourable Everard Supple whose likeness I was conjuring on to canvas in my studio that sultry July evening?

I have waded through some guff this week – now it’s the WHEEEEEEEKEND and I return my thoughts and random snerkles to this, whilst intermittently ‘avast’ing away with snippets of teh ‘enry Morgan. Tell me what could be better and I will call you a liar.

Fun but less so from The Pale Man onwards.

The Corn is Green by Emlyn Williams

bookshelves: period-piece, britain-wales, published-1941, play-dramatisation, summer-2014, amusing

Recommended to ☯Bettie☯ by: Laura
Read on August 11, 2014

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04d0kl1

Description: Miss Moffat, an English spinster, settles in a Welsh mining village where she starts a school for the boys of the neighborhood. Morgan Evans shows promise and Miss Moffat determines to do everything possible for him. Against the prejudice of local folk and the wealthy squire, she manages to make good, and in Morgan she finds a young man who will go far. She at last persuades the squire to lend his support, and she prepares the boy to apply for a scholarship to Oxford. Morgan, however, rebels against help from a woman and temporarily succumbs to the charm of a flashy girl. His mistaken sense of obligation nearly ruins his chances of success, and Miss Moffat realizes that her interest in him has become too absorbing. However, her affection for him, her courage and wisdom in the end bring her victory; Morgan wins the scholarship, and Miss Moffat’s work comes to a happy conclusion.

BBC Blurberoonies: Scene: Glansarno, a small village in a remote Welsh countryside. Teacher Miss Moffat is determined to win local miners over to her English ways in this semi-autobiographical work by Emlyn Williams. Time: a period of three years in the latter part of the 19th century.

Tongue in cheek fun at expense of the Chapel, Child Labour, Zenophobia, Misogeny, Blue-stocking Idealism and Willing Repression. Wonderful fun

Best line: ‘Leave those flowers to die a natural death in their beds’

Miss Moffat: Gladys Young.
Morgan Evans: Richard Burton.
Welsh folk songs sung by boys from Aberdare County School.
Adapted for broadcasting by T Rowland Hughes. Produced by PH Burton.
First broadcast on Saturday Night Theatre – BBC Home Service 27th January 1945

The Invisible Code by Christopher Fowler

 

Description: Two small children are playing a game called ‘Witch-Hunter’. They place a curse on a young woman taking lunch in a church courtyard and wait for her to die. An hour later the woman is indeed found dead inside St Bride’s Church – a building that no-one else has entered. Unfortunately Bryant & May are refused the case. Instead, there are hired by their greatest enemy to find out why his wife has suddenly started behaving strangely. She’s become an embarrassment to him at government dinners, and he is convinced that someone is trying to drive her insane. She has even taken to covering the mirrors in her apartment, and believes herself to be the victim of witchcraft. Then a society photographer is stabbed to death in a nearby park and suddenly a link emerges between the two cases. And so begins an investigation that will test the members of the Peculiar Crimes Unit to their limits, setting Arthur Bryant off on a trail that leads to Bedlam and Bletchley Park, and into the world of madness, codes and the secret of London’s strangest relic.

The Rake Taking Possession of the Estate by Hogarth

A madcap romp through some of the most interesting snippets of London’s history. Add in a Twist of MPs’ Wives (collective noun), a shaken-not-stirred Bethlehem variant, swirl in a whole bunch of code, and top off with three sherbet lemons, a fourth half sucked. What have you got? A rollicking good, solid Bryant and May insert.

3* – Full Dark House (2003)
4* – The Water Room (2004)
4* – Seventy-Seven Clocks (2005)
3* – Ten Second Staircase (2006)
3.5* – White Corridor (2007)
3.5* – The Victoria Vanishes (2008)
3* – Bryant and May on the Loose (2009)
4* – Off the Rails (2010)
3.5* – Bryant and May and the Memory of Blood (2011)
3.5* – The Invisible Code (2012)

Halfway To Hollywood: Diaries 1980 to 1988 (Palin Diaries, #2) by Michael Palin

bookshelves: summer-2014, nonfiction, amusing, epistolatory-diary-blog, published-2009, radio-4x

Read from July 22 to 28, 2014

 

R4x

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01q9d5c

After listening to the first book of his diaries, it is lovely that R4x is continuing on.

1/5 Recalling his frenetic 1980s, Michael Palin tells of Monty Python, challenging railway journeys and his daughter starting school.

2/5 Michael Palin recalls bedroom frolics in The Missionary and confusion at an ear specialist

3/5 Michael’s mum making it big in America, grappling with a pig in ‘A Private Function’ and a crucial meeting with George Harrison.

4/5 Recalling the 1980s, Michael Palin shares fond recollections of his sister Angela and the germ of A Fish Called Wanda.

5/5 Lots of kissing, the rushes look good, and a career swerve into world travel beckons. Michael Palin concludes his memoirs.

4* Around the World in 80 Days
3* Diaries: The Python Years, 1969-1979 (Palin Diaries, #1)
3* Pole to Pole
2* Hemingway’s Chair
3* Halfway To Hollywood: Diaries 1980 to 1988 (Palin Diaries, #2)
1* The Truth