I Am Spock by Leonard Nimoy

heh

Narrated by Nimoy; No! Narrated by Spock – oh hell! Both of them read this.

Description: I Am Spock is the second volume of actor and director Leonard Nimoy’s autobiography. The book was published in 1995, four years after the release of the last Star Trek motion picture starring the entire original cast, and covers the majority of Nimoy’s time with Star Trek in general and Mr. Spock in particular. The book’s title was a reference to the first volume of his autobiography, I Am Not Spock, which had been published in 1975. At that time Nimoy had sought to distance his own personality from that of the character of Spock, although he nonetheless remained proud of his time on the show. Negative fan reaction to the title gave Nimoy the idea for the title of the second volume.

Love the conversation going on here; the style unfolds the memoir beautifully. Quick encounter that took me back to those early years.

She Walks These Hills (Ballad, #3) by Sharyn McCrumb

bookshelves: summer-2014, tbr-busting-2014, published-1994, newtome-author, historical-fiction, lifestyles-deathstyles, mystery-thriller, north-americas

Read from July 09 to 20, 2014

 

Narrated by Sally Darling.

Description: Historian Jeremy Cobb is backpacking on the Appalachian Trail, attempting to retrace the tragic journey of eighteen-year-old Katie Wyler, who was captured by the Shawnee after the massacre of her pioneer family in Mitchell County, North Carolina. In late summer, Katie escaped from a Shawnee village on the banks of the Ohio, and followed the rivers through the wilderness to find her way home – a brave journey that ended in sorrow. Jeremy, a city-bred graduate student with no trail experience, is determined to complete his scholarly quest, unaware that his journey will be both a trial of hardships and a mystical experience. He does not know that the spirit of Katie Wyler is still seen wandering the hills, trying to get home. Mountain wise woman Nora Bonesteel sees her every autumn “when the air is crisp and the light is slanted and the birds are still.” Hiram Sorley, known as Harm, is also at large in the Appalachian wilderness. Sorely, who has escaped from the Northeast Correctional Center in Mountain City, Tennessee, is the focus of a wide-spread manhunt involving most of the area’s law enforcement officers. There’s just one problem: nobody wants him caught. Harm has become a folk hero. Sheriff Spencer Arrowood feels sorry for Harm, imprisoned for life for killing a hated local bureaucrat. There is even some doubt about Harm’s guilt. Besides, the elderly convict has Korsakoff’s syndrome, a disease that robs its sufferers of their recent memories. To Harm, it is always 1967. Harm doesn’t even remember the crime. For Martha Ayers, who wants the job of deputy, catching Harm Sorely would be the best way to prove her fitness for the position. Harm, an Appalachian Don Quixote on the edge ofreality, meets both Jeremy and the still-wandering Katie Wyler on his journey back to a home that isn’t there anymore. He is the “last moonshiner, ” holding the dream of an unspoiled wilderness in the fragile web of his delusions. When he goes, it will be lost forever.

In true Bettie style, I dive straight into a one off from the middle of a series. Interesting premise, nicely read, stunning scenery and an enigmatic running woman on the deer track.

Best line: ‘People who have been shot at don’t take desk jobs seriously.’

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt

bookshelves: one-penny-wonder, true-grime, published-1994, spring-2011, nonfiction, north-americas, amusing, paper-read

Recommended to ☯Bettie☯ by: Brazilliant Laura
Read from May 13 to 14, 2011, read count: 2


** spoiler alert ** There is an inserted map, i.e. non attached, and given that this is a one-penny wonder I will forgive that I have seen the map with the biro comments – at this stage, the opening, nothing means nothing to me.

Double negatives do work the right way sometimes.

So, given that I have just gawped at how many have already have read this I am, right now, un-hyped and uninitiated as to what this is all about. I am hoping it will be along the lines of Savage Garden where there are follies and secrets in a garden designed as if it was the woods before the journey into Dante’s circles of hell. ETA I like surprises, that is why lots of books are bought, if I can nab ’em for a penny, without any prior knowledge as to genre. Just a few pages in and this is non-fiction, however it has not been established yet whether the line is Charles Manson or real life Savage Garden.

First line He was tall, about fifty, with darkly handsome, almost sinister features: a neatly trimmed mustache*, hair turning silver at the temples, and eyes so black they were like the tinted windows of a sleek limousine – he could see out, but you couldn’t see in.

*mustache – what a weird way of spelling moustaches.

Page 31 – ‘If you go to Atlanta, the first question they ask is, “What’s your business?” In Macon they ask, “where do you go to church?” In Augusta they ask your grandmother’s maiden name. But in Savannah the first question people ask you is “What would you like to drink?”‘

——-

Round about page 250, which is a fair way into Part II, I started skimming; first paragraphs then full pages and then only honing in on key words. Does anyone else see this as a cheap writer’s trick? The same way I saw Capote’s In Cold Blood

To sum up then, Part I has some beautiful portraiture and endearing whimsy. I loved learning about the restoration of Savannah and its lovely squares. Berendt lived/leached off Savannah and its occupants, and if I feel soiled then think of the people who live there.

4* for the wonderful characters; 1* for the journalist’s insiduousity; 5 stars for showing me around Savannah; 3* for (front-loaded) reading pleasure.

‘You mustn’t be taken in by moonlight and magnolias. There’s more to Savannah than that.

 

Monterey Square, Savannah”

 

1973 pontiac grand prix”

 

Tybee Island”

Twelve miles east of Savannah, beneath shallow layers of sand and water, an abandoned 7,600 pound nuclear bomb is biding its time, waiting to rain death and destruction on the southern Atlantic coastline. If not disarmed, perhaps some sleepy Sunday morning an atomic fireball will erupt on picturesque Wassaw Sound, shooting along nearby heavily travelled Interstate 80 with the force of a hundred hurricanes, instantly vaporizing tidal wetlands, and brutally fire-storming a vibrant, thriving metropolis—women, children, more than 200,000 people instantly incinerated—into a crumbling, deserted heap of radioactive rubble.
A cold, calculated act of terrorism? Not quite. It’s simply that the United States Air Force isn’t in the habit of picking up after itself.

 

The Lost Heart Of Asia by Colin Thubron

bookshelves: under-500-ratings, published-1994, travel, nonfiction, paper-read, one-penny-wonder, politics, turkmenistan, dip-in-now-and-again, spring-2014, books-with-a-passport, lifestyles-deathstyles, uzbekistan, kazakstan, kyrgyzstan

Read from March 05 to 16, 2014

 

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Description: Thubron travelled throughout Central Asia in the wake of the break-up of the Soviet Union and documented the widespread social upheaval in a region reeling from political change. Thubron is an inspirational writer, intrepid traveller and insightful observer and his The Lost Heart of Asia is an outstanding guide to the history, people and culture of a vast region resonating with history and politics.

Opening: TURKMENISTAN: The sea had fallen behind us, and we were flying above a desrt of dream-like immensity. Its sands melted into the sky, corroding every horizon in a colourless light. Nothing suggested we were anywhere, or even moving at all. The last solid objects in the universe were the wing-tips of the plane.

Ashkhabad

Makhtumkuli – the eighteenth-century founder of Turkic literature.

It is claimed that Merv was briefly the largest city in the world in the 12th century.

Bukhara is the capital of Uzbekistan

Samarkand

When God loved us
he gave us Amu Dariya
When he ceased to love us
He sent us Russian engineers

4* In Siberia
3* The Lost Heart of Asia
3* To a Mountain in Tibet
2* Journey Into Cyprus

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Empty Cradles

bookshelves: nonfiction, nottingham, politics, published-1994, winter-20132014, under-1000-ratings, true-grime, tragedy, tbr-busting-2014, lifestyles-deathstyles, families, australia, catholic, bdsm

Read on January 30, 2014

Emily Watson … Margaret Humphreys

Description: In 1986 Margaret Humphreys, a Nottingham social worker, investigated the case of a woman who claimed that, at the age of four, she had been put on a boat to Australia by the British government. Margaret Humphreys soon discovered that as many as 150,000 children had in fact been deported from children’s homes in Britian and shipped off to a “new life” in distant parts of the Empire—the last as recently as 1967. For numerous children it was to be a life of horrendous physical and sexual abuse in institutions in Western Australia and elsewhere. Margaret Humphreys reveals how she gradually unravelled this shocking secret, how she became drawn into the lives of some of these innocent and unwilling exiles, and how it became her mission to reunite them with their families.

The woman whose claim that she was exported at 4 year’s old, started off Humphrey’s investigation.

The Trailer

Margaret Humphreys

Constructing Bindoon


The song from the film: Cat Stevens ‘Wild World’

‘Bindoon and I’ll slip you one’ seems to have been the Roman Catholic nose tap between the Brothers. UGH!

I can’t comment on the book or the writing style but I can tell you that this horror story has sickened me to the core.

24th Feb 2010, Gordon Brown Apologises for the abuse of children transported thousands of miles from home.